Delicious and Authentic Szechuan in the Suburbs? It’s possible!

Now, if you’re not familiar with Szechuan (or aka Sichuan) cuisine (四川菜), a quick overview is that the flavor is bold, and commonly spicy.  A popular style is called Mala (麻辣) and is basically a mixture of spicy and numbness (from the Chinese peppercorns added in Mala dishes).  If you’re interested in awesome Mala dishes, check out my visit to Old Sichuan’s Hot Pot restaurant in Taiwan here!

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Dim Sum Yummy Dishes

Get it?  “THEM SOME YUMMY DISHES!?” Nevermind my lame puns.  Anyway, for those of you that are unfamiliar with Dim Sum, it’s similar to Tapas where you order a bunch of small dishes of food as a meal.  Except, when you go to a Dim Sum restaurant, there are actually people pushing cart-full of different foods around and they come by your table and ask if you’re interested in any of what they have.  If you are, you order it and they mark it on your tab.

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The “Southern Soul” of Barbecue

You can’t leave out the South if you want some good BBQ! It’s definitely one of my favorite styles of food, and one of the best places I’ve ever had it is probably Southern Soul on St. Simons Island, Georgia.  You might recall my visit last time to St. Simons and Jekyll Island located in south Georgia a while back.  Food was good then, and food there is good now!

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taiwan chef airport

Stewed Pork Knuckle Dinner at a Taiwanese Airport

Chef Teng is a well known restaurant chain in Taiwan.  Like any other chains though it started with one restaurant.    I learned that the background of Chef Teng is that he studied some french cuisine in Japan a while back and incorporated some French cuisine in to Taiwanese food, which I found interesting.  The most popular dishes are Beef Noodles Soup and Stewed Pork Knuckles.  Chef Teng’s has been around for years, and now there are several different locations, including at the Kaohsiung Airport!

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Old Sichuan’s Mala Hot Pot, Spicy and Numb!

Sichuan (四川), more commonly known as Szechuan in the Western world, is a province in China.  Mala is a very popular Szechuan sauce or style of food from there.  The direct translation of Mala actually describes the taste almost perfectly: Ma = Numb, La = Spicy.  (However, I said almost perfectly because it left out that the taste is what I describe as magical!)  The numbness actually comes from the Chinese peppercorn in the Mala sauce.

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